Advantage (cryptography) – Wikipedia

In cryptography, an adversary ‘s advantage is a measuring stick of how successfully it can attack a cryptanalytic algorithm, by distinguishing it from an idealize version of that type of algorithm. note that in this context, the “ adversary “ is itself an algorithm and not a person. A cryptanalytic algorithm is considered impregnable if no adversary has a non-negligible advantage, subject to specified bounds on the adversary ‘s computational resources ( see concrete security ). “ negligible ” normally means “ within O ( 2−p ) ” where p is a security argument associated with the algorithm. For model, p might be the number of bits in a block cipher ‘s winder .

description of concept [edit ]

Let F be an oracle for the function being studied, and let G be an oracle for an idealize function of that type. The adversary A is a probabilistic algorithm, given F or G as input signal, and which outputs 1 or 0. A ‘s occupation is to distinguish F from G, based on making queries to the oracle that it ‘s given. We say : A five hundred five ( A ) = | Pr [ A ( F ) = 1 ] − Pr [ A ( G ) = 1 ] | { \displaystyle Adv ( A ) =|\Pr [ A ( F ) =1 ] -\Pr [ A ( G ) =1 ] | } Adv(A)=|\Pr[A(F)=1]-\Pr[A(G)=1]|

Examples [edit ]

Let F be a random exemplify of the DES block zero. This cipher has 64-bit blocks and a 56-bit key. The key therefore selects one of a family of 256 permutations on the 264 possible 64-bit blocks. A “ random DES exemplify ” means our oracle F computes DES using some key K ( which is unknown to the adversary ) where K is selected from the 256 possible keys with equal probability. We want to compare the DES exemplify with an idealized 64-bit block cipher, meaning a substitution selected at random from the ( 264 ) ! possible permutations on 64-bit blocks. Call this randomly selected permutation G. Note from Stirling ‘s estimate that ( 264 ) ! is around 10 3.47 × 10 20 { \displaystyle 10^ { 3.47\times 10^ { 20 } } } 10^{{3.47\times 10^{{20}}}}, so flush specifying which permutation is selected requires writing down a number besides large to represent precisely in any real computer. Viewed another room, G is an case of a “ cipher ” whose “ key duration ” is about 1021 bits, which again is excessively big to fit in a calculator. ( We can, however, follow through G with memory space proportional to the number of queries, using a random prophet ).

note that because the oracles were given code plaintext of our choose, we ‘re modelling a chosen-plaintext attack or CPA, and the advantage we ‘re calculating can be called the CPA-advantage of a given adversary. If we besides had decoding oracles available, we ‘d be doing a chosen-ciphertext attack or CCA and finding the CCA-advantage of the adversary.

exemplar 1 : estimate at random [edit ]

Call this adversary A0. It just flips a coin and returns 1 or 0 with equal probability and without making any prophet calls. Thus, Pr [ A0 ( F ) =1 ] and Pr [ A0 ( G ) =1 ] are both 0.5. The difference between these probabilities is zero, so Adv ( A0 ) is zero. The same thing applies if we constantly return 0, or always return 1 : the probability is the like for both F and G, so the advantage is zero. This adversary ca n’t tell F and G apart. If we ‘re code designers, our desire ( possibly not accomplishable ) is to make it so that it ‘s computationally impracticable for any adversary to do significantly better than this. We will have succeeded if we can make a code for which there ‘s no distinguisher faster than animal force search.

This adversary ( call it A1 ) will attempt to cryptanalyze its input signal by beastly violence. It has its own DES implementation. It gives a one question to its oracle, asking for the 64-bit string of all zeroes to be encrypted. Call the resulting ciphertext E0. It then runs an exhaustive samara search. The algorithm looks like this :

 E0 = oracle_query(0)
 for k in 0,1,...,256-1:
   if DESk(0) == E0: 
      return 1
 return 0

This searches the integral 56-bit DES keyspace and returns “ 1 ” if it probably finds a equal identify. In practice, several plaintexts are required to confirm the identify, as two different keys can result in one or more duplicate plaintext-ciphertext pairs. If no key is found, it returns 0. If the remark prophet is DES, this exhaustive search is certain to find the identify, so Pr [ A1 ( F ) =1 ] = 1. If the remark oracle is a random substitution, there are 264 potential values of E0, and at most 256 of them will get examined in the DES keysearch. So the probability of A1 returning 1 is at most 2−8. That is :

P radius [ A 1 ( G ) = 1 ] ≤ 2 − 8 { \displaystyle Pr [ A_ { 1 } ( G ) =1 ] \leq 2^ { -8 } } {\displaystyle Pr[A_{1}(G)=1]\leq 2^{-8}}, so A d five ( A 1 ) = | P gas constant [ A 1 ( F ) = 1 ] − P gas constant [ A 1 ( G ) = 1 ] | ≥ 1 − 2 − 8 { \displaystyle Adv ( A_ { 1 } ) =|Pr [ A_ { 1 } ( F ) =1 ] -Pr [ A_ { 1 } ( G ) =1 ] |\geq 1-2^ { -8 } } {\displaystyle Adv(A_{1})=|Pr[A_{1}(F)=1]-Pr[A_{1}(G)=1]|\geq 1-2^{-8}} so the advantage is at least about 0.996. This is a near-certain distinguisher, but it ‘s not a security failure because it ‘s no faster than beast force search, after all, it is the animal pull search .

See besides [edit ]

References [edit ]

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